as PRIMARY INSTRUCTOR:

English 98r: "World Literature and the African Diaspora"
Harvard College (Fall 2017)

This Junior Tutorial provides a broad introduction to the study of the literature of the African diaspora and to a series of questions, methods, and discourses grouped broadly under the term “world literature.” We’ll cover works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from the United States, Canada, Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, and Europe—in English as well as in translation from various non-Anglophone languages, including French, Spanish, Arabic, and Russian. At the same time, we’ll track developments within literary criticism and literary theory that seek to study texts beyond and against the nation-state as a spatialized container for cultural production. These critical moves have fallen variously under the umbrellas of the postcolonial, the global Anglophone, the international, the world and the planetary and the global (which, to some, are not merely synonymous), and a slew of sub-fields in Americanist scholarship. While we orient ourselves to these broader conceptual problems, we will dedicate most of our time and energy to the craft and science of conducting original research in literary studies.

Works include: Alexander Pushkin, "My Genealogy" (1830) and The Moor of Peter the Great (1837); Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852); Claude McKay, Banjo: A Story without a Plot (1929); Tayeb Salih, Season of Migration to the North (1967); David Walcott, The Star-Apple Kingdom (1979); Toni Morrison, Tar Baby (1981); Manuel Zapata Olivella, Changó, the Biggest Badass (1983); David Dabydeen, Slave Song (1984) and Turner (1994); Gloria Naylor, Linden Hills (1985); Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Place (1988), George Elliot Clarke, Whylah Falls (1990); Alain Mabankcou, Letter to Jimmy (2007); Zadie Smith, Swing Time (2016).

See course syllabus.

as TEACHING FELLOW:

English 178x: "The American Novel: Dreiser to the Present"
Professor Philip Fisher
Harvard College (Spring 2018)

A survey of the 20th-century novel, its forms, patterns of ideas, techniques, cultural context, rivalry with film and radio, short story, and fact. 

Works include: Willa Cather, My Ántonia (1918); Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence (1920); Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms (1929); William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury (1929); J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye (1951); Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man (1952); Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita (1955); Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping (1980); Ha Jin, Waiting (1999); Ben Lerner, Leaving the Atocha Station (2011); stories by Henry James, Jack London, Sherwood Anderson, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Mary Gaitskill, David Foster Wallace, Ann Beattie, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Richard Ford.


English S-177v: "American Literary Expatriates in Europe"
Professor Glenda Carpio
Ca' Foscari-Harvard Summer School (Summer 2017)

This course explores the fiction and travel literature produced by American writers living in Europe, from the late 19th century to the present. In the course of this period Europe becomes the battlefield for two bloody World Wars as well as the site of a museum past while the USA assumes a dominant role on the world stage. American writers living and traveling in Europe reflect on these shifts and changes while also exploring the various forms of freedom and complex set of contradictions that expatriate life affords. We will focus on American literature set in Europe with readings that include but are not limited to essays, travelogues, poems, novellas, novels, and short stories.

Works include: Henry James, The Aspern Papers (1888) and "The Italian Hours" (1909), selections; Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad (1869), selections; Gertrude Stein, Tender Buttons (1914), selections and The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (1933), selctions; T.S. Eliot, "The Waste Land" (1922); Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises (1926), A Moveable Feast (1958), selections and The Garden of Eden (1986); Edith Wharton, "Roman Fever" (1934); Langston Hughes, The Big Sea (1940), selections and I Wonder as I Wander (1956), selections; Mary McCarthy, Venice Observed (1956), selections; Richard Wright, Pagan Spain (1957), selections; James Baldwin, Notes of a Native Son (1955), selections and Giovanni's Room (1956); Joseph Brodsky, Watermark: An Essay on Venice (1989), selections; Samuel Delany, "Cage of Brass" (2003); Ben Lerner, Leaving the Atocha Station (2011).

See course syllabus.


English 68: "Migrations: American Immigrant Literature"
Professor Glenda Carpio
Harvard College (Spring 2017)

What constitutes American immigrant literature? What are its aesthetic conventions, what is its literary history? The very category of “immigrant fiction” has been subject to debate, with some critics and fiction writers claiming that it is either too narrow or too broad—pertaining only to the ethnic groups it represents or treating universal topics and thus becoming a questionable, isolated category. This course explores this debate, taking on a comparative approach that is rooted in a historicized exploration of immigrant narratives in American literature.

Works include: Abraham Cahan, Yekl: A Tale of the New York Ghetto (1896); Hamilton Holt, The Life Stories of Undistinguished Americans as Told by Themselves (1906); Israel Zangwill, The Melting-Pot: A Play in Three Acts (1908); Mary Antin, The Promised Land (1912); Henry Roth, Call It Sleep (1934); Richard Rodriguez, Hunger of Memory (1982); Jamaica Kincaid, Lucy (1990); Junot Díaz, Drown (1996); Gary Shteyngart, The Russian Debutante's Handbook (2003); Junot Díaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007); Aleksandar Hemon, The Lazarus Project (2008); Ilan Stavans, ed., Becoming Americans (2009); Teju Cole, Open City (2011); Junot Díaz, This Is How You Lose Her (2012); Dinaw Mengestu, All Our Names (2014).

See course syllabus.


English 166: "American Modernism"
Professor David Alworth
Harvard College (Fall 2016)

A comparative study of American Modernism that considers literature alongside visual art, technology, media, history, politics, and intellectual culture. Emphasis will fall on novels written between 1900 and 1960, but we will also address poetry, drama, cultural criticism, and philosophy. 

Guest lecture: "Du Bois, Toomer, and New Negro Modernism"

Works include: Henry James, Portrait of a Lady (1881); Gertrude Stein, Three Lives (1908); T. S. Eliot, "The Waste Land" (1922) ; F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (1925); Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises (1926); William Faulkner The Sound and the Fury (1929); Willa Cather, My Ántonia (1918); W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk (1903);  Jean Toomer, Cane (1923); Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse (1927).

See course syllabus.


English S-177v: "American Literary Expatriates in Europe"
Professor Glenda Carpio
Ca' Foscari-Harvard Summer School (Summer 2016)

This course explores the fiction and travel literature produced by American writers living in Europe, from Henry James to the present. In the course of this period the relationship between Old to New World continuously evolves. We focus on American literature set in Europe with readings that include but are not limited to essays, travelogues, poems, novellas, novels, and short stories.

Works include: Henry James, Daisy Miller (1878) and The Aspern Papers (1888); Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad (1869); Gertrude Stein, Tender Buttons (1914) and The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (1933); T.S. Eliot, "The Waste Land" (1922); Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises (1926), A Moveable Feast (1958), and The Garden of Eden (1986); Henry Miller, The Tropic of Cancer (1934); Richard Wright, Pagan Spain (1957); James Baldwin, Notes of a Native Son (1955) and Giovanni's Room (1956); Ben Lerner, Leaving the Atocha Station (2011).

See course syllabus.