Teaching

 
 

As primary instructor

 

English 98r: "World Literature and the African Diaspora"
Harvard College (Fall 2017)

This Junior Tutorial provides a broad introduction to the study of the literature of the African diaspora and to a series of questions, methods, and discourses grouped broadly under the term “world literature.” We’ll cover works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from the United States, Canada, Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, and Europe—in English as well as in translation from various non-Anglophone languages, including French, Spanish, Arabic, and Russian. At the same time, we’ll track developments within literary criticism and literary theory that seek to study texts beyond and against the nation-state as a spatialized container for cultural production. While we orient ourselves to these broader conceptual problems, we will dedicate most of our time and energy to the craft and science of conducting original research in literary studies.

 
 

AS TEACHING FELLOW

 

English 178x: "The American Novel: Dreiser to the Present"
Professor Philip Fisher
Harvard College (Spring 2018)

A survey of the 20th-century novel, its forms, patterns of ideas, techniques, cultural context, rivalry with film and radio, short story, and fact. Two goals will guide the lectures, worksheets, reading assignments, short papers and take home final exam within this course: first, to give a detailed critical reading of a representative set of classic American novels and short stories written between 1900 and 2016; and second, to connect the novels and short stories to the wider questions of 20th century American culture.


English S-177v: "American Literary Expatriates in Europe"
Professor Glenda Carpio
Ca' Foscari-Harvard Summer School (Summer 2017)

This course explores the fiction and travel literature produced by American writers living in Europe, from the late 19th century to the present. In the course of this period Europe becomes the battlefield for two bloody World Wars as well as the site of a museum past while the USA assumes a dominant role on the world stage. American writers living and traveling in Europe reflect on these shifts and changes while also exploring the various forms of freedom and complex set of contradictions that expatriate life affords. We will focus on American literature set in Europe with readings that include but are not limited to essays, travelogues, poems, novellas, novels, and short stories.


English 68: "Migrations: American Immigrant Literature"
Professor Glenda Carpio
Harvard College (Spring 2017)

What constitutes American immigrant literature? What are its aesthetic conventions, what is its literary history? The very category of “immigrant fiction” has been subject to debate, with some critics and fiction writers claiming that it is either too narrow or too broad—pertaining only to the ethnic groups it represents or treating universal topics and thus becoming a questionable, isolated category. This course explores this debate, taking on a comparative approach that is rooted in a historicized exploration of immigrant narratives in American literature.


English 166: "American Modernism"
Professor David Alworth
Harvard College (Fall 2016)

A comparative study of American Modernism that considers literature alongside visual art, technology, media, history, politics, and intellectual culture. Emphasis will fall on novels written between 1900 and 1960, but we will also address poetry, drama, cultural criticism, and philosophy. 


English S-177v: "American Literary Expatriates in Europe"
Professor Glenda Carpio
Ca' Foscari-Harvard Summer School (Summer 2016)

This course explores the fiction and travel literature produced by American writers living in Europe, from Henry James to the present. In the course of this period the relationship between Old to New World continuously evolves. We focus on American literature set in Europe with readings that include but are not limited to essays, travelogues, poems, novellas, novels, and short stories.

 

as tutorial board teaching fellow

Comparative Literature 98a/b: "Tutorial—Junior Year"
Harvard College (Fall 2017/Spring 2018)

Individual directed reading and writing tutorial on queer of color critique and contemporary cinema, working toward special field on "Nationalism and Activism in Modern America: The HIV/AIDS Crisis in Public Art and Media."


Comparative Literature 98a: "Tutorial—Junior Year"
Harvard College (Fall 2017/Spring 2018)

Individual directed reading and writing tutorial on contemporary Hip-Hop and European Modernism, working toward special field on "Portrayals of Adolescence in Hip-Hop Culture."