Conferences

 

Previous Panels

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"The Return of Generic Criticism," ACLA Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, March 29-April 1.

Nicholas Rinehart (Harvard University), "Genre as Event, Event as Genre: Slave Testimony and Historical Poetics"
Ruth Martin Curry (Northwestern University), "Bakhtin, Socratic Dialogue, and the Genre Wars"
Lara Cahill-Booth (University of Miami), "The Rise of Macunaima: Hero Takes on the Novel in Pauline Melville’s The Ventriloquist’s Tale"
Mike Phillips (CUNY Graduate Center), "Echo-Criticism: Bakhtin, Kurosawa, and Generic Materialism"
Elias G. Saba (Grinnell College), "Games of Law: Islamic Legal Genres in the 14th Century"
Mengjun Li (University of Southern California), "The Formularized Body: Male Anxieties and Genre Fiction in Early Modern China"
Todd Nordgren (Northwestern University), "'The Social Life of Forms': Queer Genres and Genre's Queer Possibilities"
Anne Stevens (University of Nevada) and Molly O'Donnell (James Madison University), "The Microgenre in Theory and Practice"

"The Work of the Anthology in American Literature," Annual MLA Convention, New York, NY, January 4-7.

Nicholas Rinehart (Harvard University), presiding
Shelley Fisher Fishkin (Stanford University)
Sandra Gustafson (University of Notre Dame)
Patrick Jagoda (University of Chicago)
Carla Kaplan (Northeastern University)
Tavia Nyong'o (Yale University)
Wai Chee Dimock (Yale University), responding


20
17

"Afro-Asian Americana: Food, Fiction, Film," Annual MLA Convention, Philadelphia, PA, January 5-8.

J. Ryan Marks (Penn State University), presiding
Tao Leigh Goffe (New York University): "What’s Eating Pearl Chang?: Chop Suey and Afro­-Asian Revolutionary Romance"
Nicholas Rinehart (Harvard University): "Richard Wright's Globalism: Before and Beyond Bandung"
Kinohi Nishikawa (Princeton University): "The Outsiders: Black Sun and Incommensurability"
Aldon Lynn Nielsen (Penn State University), responding


20
16

"Unsettling the Slave Narrative," Biennial C19 Conference, State College, PA, March 17-20.

Nicholas Rinehart (Harvard University): "Toussaint Louverture, Frederick Douglass, and Enslaved Testimony in the French Atlantic"
Nele Sawallisch (Johannes Gutenberg University): "The Unsettling Canadian Slave Narratives"
Michaël Roy (Université Paris 13): "Unsettling the Slave Narrative through Book History"
Bryan Sinche (University of Hartford): "Robert B. Anderson and the Walking Book"


20
15

"Legal History and Slave Resistance," OIEAHC-SEA Joint Conference, Chicago, IL, June 18-21.

Nicholas Rinehart (Harvard University): "'And render Hell/More Tolerable': Slaves' Internal Economies and the Limits of Resistance"
Kelly A. Ryan (Indiana University Southeast): "'I Won't Stand This': New York Slaves' Resistance to Violence"
Randy M. Browne (Xavier University): "Property Rights, Slaves' Legal Activism, and the Struggle to Survive in the British Caribbean"
Trevor Burnard (University of Melbourne), discussant

"World Literature/Immigrant Literature," Annual NeMLA Convention, Toronto, Canada, April 30-May 3.

Nicholas Rinehart (Harvard University): "The Rhetoric of Diaspora: Diaz, Cole, Mengestu"
Emily Anderson (SUNY-Buffalo): "Occupying the ‘Little House’: Contemporary Immigrant Appropriations of Laura Ingalls Wilder"
Gabriel Page (Berkeley): "Post-Immigrant Fiction and the State of the Nation"
Elizabeth Janssen (UWashington): "‘Hear What Is Being Said’: Self-Reflexivity in Contemporary African Immigrant Literature"


20
14

"Black and White and Red All Over: Literary Allegiances and Lineages between African America and Russia," Annual MELUS Conference/Ralph Ellison Centennial Symposium, Oklahoma City University, March 6-9.

Nicholas Rinehart (Harvard College): "Ralph Ellison and Russian Authors"
Raquel Greene (Grinnell College): "In to Africa: The Soviet Union and its Civilizing Mission in the 1920s"
John MacKay (Yale University): "True Songs of Freedom: Uncle Tom's Cabin in the Soviet 1920s"

 

Previous Symposia

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18

Graduate Prospectus Conference and Teaching Workshop, Harvard English Department, April 6.

The purpose of the Prospectus Conference is threefold: first, to discuss the prospectus-writing and dissertation-formulating process; second, to explain the premises and stakes of the dissertation project to those outside one's immediate subfield; and third, to strategize for a productive summer. The Teaching Workshop provides an all-too-rare opportunity to discuss pedagogy across the cohorts in an informal, town hall setting.


20
17

“Research Practicum: Tips, Tricks, and Techniques,” Harvard English Graduate Symposium, November 17. [program]

This year's Symposium will address the important—though all-too-often unexamined—logistical questions, concerns, and conundrums that arise from the process of conducting original research: How do we conceptualize projects? How do we seek out and use databases and archives, digital and/or manuscript? How do we frame the ethical implications of our work? What research methodologies  might we pursue beyond merely reading? The Symposium will provide an opportunity for graduate students and faculty in the department to share best strategies for conceptualizing, organizing, and actualizing research projects—from term papers to conference talks and dissertation chapters.

 

Graduate Prospectus Conference and Teaching Workshop, Harvard English Department, May 5. [program]

The purpose of the Prospectus Conference is threefold: first, to discuss the prospectus-writing and dissertation-formulating process; second, to explain the premises and stakes of the dissertation project to those outside one's immediate subfield; and third, to strategize for a productive summer. The Teaching Workshop provides an all-too-rare opportunity to discuss pedagogy across the cohorts in an informal, town hall setting.


20
16

“How To Do Things with Disciplines,” Harvard English Graduate Symposium, November 10-11. [program]

Literary studies is perhaps unique in its openness to borrowing methodological tools from other disciplines, and while graduate students often feel pressure to do “interdisciplinary” work—especially at the dissertation stage—we rarely stop to consider what that means. Moreover, questions of method continue to preoccupy contemporary debates in literary criticism. Our Symposium, then, aims to think through these developments and dilemmas as they arise in our research: What does it mean to work across disciplines? What challenges does that process present? How might our disciplinary training enable us to train ourselves in other fields? How can we produce work that speaks to multiple scholarly communities? And how can we do justice to the disciplines whose methods we integrate with our own?